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Equipment Review: The Best Coffee Grinder and Our Testing Winners (Burr vs. Blade Coffee Grinders)



Coffee aficionados have long debated the best brewing method, but is the secret to great coffee all in the grind?

Buy Our Winning Burr Coffee Grinder: https://cooks.io/2BV2GZX
Buy Our Best Buy Burr Coffee Grinder: https://cooks.io/2EgaqYZ
Buy Our Winning Blade Coffee Grinder: https://cooks.io/2UnPHXP
Behind the Testing: https://cooks.io/2Uo3bDg
Full Testing Details and Ranking Chart: https://cooks.io/2G09BoD

Watch more equipment reviews: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDfNwXXESiU&list=PLE720EF13D4C23DDC

Check our our Is it Bad? series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcg-auvLHlw&list=PLnbzopdwFrnYk4goXGnZqSCv6_EeR-8Vt

If you want the freshest, most full-flavored cup of coffee, we always recommend grinding your own coffee beans. It’s best to do this right before you brew, as our testing has shown that the beans begin to lose flavor and aroma within an hour of being ground.

Home coffee grinders come in two styles: blade and burr. A blade grinder works like a tiny food processor, with a rapidly spinning blade that chops coffee into smaller and smaller fragments. You have to hold the grind button down, time the grind, shake the grinder periodically to distribute the beans, and visually inspect the coffee to see if it’s reached the desired consistency.

A burr grinder, by contrast, operates like a pepper mill—it forces each bean to pass through a gap of a particular size. While a blade grinder has one chamber where you load, grind, and dispense the beans, a burr grinder consists of three components: a hopper where you feed in the beans, the grinding chamber, and a removable container that holds the grounds so you can transfer them to the coffee maker. You simply switch the machine on and whole beans are pulled from the hopper through two gear-like metal rings (called burrs) that spin against one another to crush the coffee. The setting you choose on the machine determines the space between the burrs and thus the size of the grind. Since each bean passes through the burrs and gets crushed only once, it’s a more precise process than using a blade grinder.

Burr grinders are the gold standard in the coffee industry, but now household brands such as Breville, Hamilton Beach, and KitchenAid are offering them for home users. To find out more about this popular grinding method, we tested 10 models priced from $29.86 to $199.99, all with metal burrs and at least eight grind settings, and compared them to our favorite blade grinder from Krups ($17.99).

Tasting the Difference: Is Grind Evenness Important?
But how much does grind evenness really affect your cup of coffee? To find out, we brewed three batches of coffee using the same beans ground in the most even burr grinder, the least even burr grinder, and our top-rated blade grinder, which achieved up to 46 percent medium pieces. We kept all the variables the same except for the grinder. A panel of 21 tasters then sampled the coffees in a blind tasting.

The verdict was surprising: Though we identified flavor differences in the batches of coffee, each made a good cup and tasters were split on which one they preferred. To verify these surprising results, we conducted this test three additional times. We also brought in coffee tasting experts, and they came to the same conclusion.

So if the evenness of your grind doesn’t matter all that much, why is the coffee industry so excited about burr grinders? With their range of settings and streamlined designs, which require the beans to pass through the grinder only once, burr grinders can guarantee consistency day after day in a way that blade grinders can’t. Ultimately, we think a good burr grinder is best for home brewing, too, since these machines are easy to use and take the guesswork out of grinding. And even though grind evenness isn’t the most important factor in how your coffee tastes, we also gave an edge to grinders that were more even, since they left no whole or partially processed beans in our grind (a waste of good coffee).

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  1. Your blind taste test confirms it, lots of the premium brand burr grinders are over-rated and over-priced. I believe a regular brand like Delonghi is pretty good enough for 90% of coffee drinkers.

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  2. I had the Breville for years and just went with the Baratza virtuoso+. Less bells and whistles but that is what I want. Love both machines.

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  3. I have a shardor burr grinder and unfortunately it is very inconsistent with how many beans is accurate for the French press I switched it from four cups to two cups and it did the same amount as it usually does for four cups.. and we had one that failed within 6 months..

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  4. It's heavy to move around the kitchen counter, but that is not a real issue MyBest.Kitchen Unit can remain on all day creating an "instant coffee" situation. Go for it!

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  5. I Think I have bought every winner from this series and it is never wrong.

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  6. I have had a Bodum Bistro for about a year now and am very happy with the results I get from it. It's not a grinder for espresso, none of the grinders reviewed in this video are, (I have a Baratza Sette 270 Wi for espresso) but for single dose French Press and pour over grinds it is serving me well. I have not experienced it throwing grinds all over the counter and suspect the reason your test kitchen had that issue was because of static which is easily remedied by adding a few drops of water (or mist) to your beans and giving them a quick stir. Also, it looks as if you tried to grind more coffee into the bin than what it is designed to hold thus you had some overflow. To anyone on the fence about the Bodum I would say buy it from Amazon ( but not if you are looking to grind for espresso), and return it in within 30 days if you dont like it, but I am having a hard time justifying replacing mine with anything else in that price range right now.

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  7. Burr grinders create the most consistent grind size? Mine did until it got a little old… and senile. It forgets what size I want, and guesses each time. Mostly giving me a full range of sizes… Trying to please me? By making sure that at least some of the grind is right? But! But! But! At least it tries, right? Well, I appreciate the attempt at conscientiousness… but I think it's time for the grinder hospice. Sad, but true. I need another partner. 😩 I'm heartless, I know. I promise to visit…

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  8. Unneccerely huge grinders made to impress and justify their price. Krups is nice.

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  9. The coffee industry also like Burr Grinders as a fair chunk of their business is in Espresso based drinks, which require an even fine grind. You can't achieve this in a blade grinder, or in the cheaper burr grinders. I use the Breville Pro (Sage in UK) at home, and it hits a good espresso grind most fo the time. Prior to that I had one similar to the Berazza, and it didn't come close.

    For pour over, or the paper filter machines that a lot fo homes have, the grind is important, but not as important. As long as it is relatively close to even, you will get a good coffee.

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  10. Good choices but for me which one would I use to grind my coffee to seal K cups

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  11. The Encore is a solid choice for pour-over and filter coffee. None of the grinders tested are sufficient for espresso, however. And the lack of any Eureka models is a shame.

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  12. Holy coffee beans, you guys killed it at how throughly you covered every aspect. 1,000,000 thank you and likes 👍

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  13. You threw out the Kitchenaid because someone broke the jar? I've had one for about 10 years and broke one jar. I'm not saying I think it's better than any others but tossing out a product because of clumsiness doesn't make sense to be. What if that same person knocked the best grinder on the ground and broke it?

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  14. I had the Baratza Encore and the motor blew within a year…..even though I cleaned it regularly.

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  15. Love the thoroughness of this channel. I would like to see the grinders tested specifically for espressos. Espresso requires a finer grind, and inconsistent grind settings may be more obvious due to the shorter extraction time. This will help weed out some machines. For example, I have the Bodum grinder and it can't really grind fine enough for my espresso machine.

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  16. You down play a grinder because your a cluts?

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  17. Could not of done a better job at presenting the reviewing process. Makes my decision in buying the right grinder for me that much easier.

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  18. April 2022. I bought the Krups blade grinder at Walmart for $19. I wanted to up my coffee game just a bit when at home. I'm not a picky coffee drinker. So far the Krups has done well and has been easy to use.

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  19. Waste research. Cheap machines. St this level just buy your coffee outside

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  20. Krups is the go-to for blade grinders, I've got an old Krups that's still going strong 20 years on, it has the push down lid not the button

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  21. Go metric system!

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  22. Surprised they never tested the vitamix here

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  23. Really appreciate the amount of actual testing that goes into these videos.

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  24. Wow, you just shook up the coffee needs. Great job …

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  25. I've owned a number of these and find the Baratza not only a great performer but replacement parts are readily available via the Internet along with YT videos that show how to replace them. Not so for the Cuisinart burr grinder. I have dead one in the basement that should be recycled.

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  26. I love my Kitchen Aid grinder, have had it for 17 years and have never broken the container.

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  27. Any advice with the oily beans, my Compresso, when removing the plastic cup, grinds go everywhere. Also the grinds stick to cups walls. Works fine with dry beans.

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  28. This is everything I have ever wanted to see. As someone who really loves analyzing things to a t, this is anazing

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  29. Love this no nonsense spot on review. Awesome!

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  30. I want to see James Hoffmann reacting to this video

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  31. Thank you, from all my research this is best video for reviewing coffee grinder

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  32. I dont see how you can get a good espresso grind from any of these machines.

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  33. I wonder what james hoffman thinks of this

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  34. What was the brewing method used?

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  35. I have the Baratza and it only lasted two years and YES I've tried cleaning it/taking it apart/using the brush etc; I'm pissed. I paid a LOT of money for it and now i'ts useless. I'm buying the Krups. I've had NO luck with Burr grinders. I'm going back to the blade.

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  36. Could you do a show on hand grinders please?

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  37. I now own both of the recommended grinders here and love them both. These thorough reviews are so incredibly helpful and make the buying process so much easier. I really can’t say thank you enough!

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  38. Excellent info for someone who knew nothing about coffee grinders. Thanks!

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  39. Just bought a burr grinder. Wow, so much better than my blade grinder I can hardly believe it.

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  40. very good info.

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  41. The KitchenAid KGC8433 burr grinder is the one with a glass container. What this means is there is none of the static cling so prevalent in the plastic containers. And absolutely no coffee gets on your countertop while grinding, or removing the glass container. And the glass container is held in place on the grinder. I pull my glass container out, dump the ground coffee into my filter basket, and put the glass container back into the grinder, why would you set it down on a countertop, where you could possibly knock it off? It is precisely because of this lack of static, and grounds getting on your countertop, plus the fact that it's quieter than any burr grinder I've used that I love it.

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  42. Glass containers don't suffer the annoying static cling that the plastic bins do. I wish a replacement container had been acquired, and the KitchenAid tested as I view the glass container as a positive. I've had many coffee makers over the years with glass carafes, and breakage hasn't been an issue.

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